A Talk With T.S. Wiley and Dr. Julie Taguchi on Bioidentical Hormones

Hi welcome to Sustainable Health. My name is T.S. Wiley. We're going to find the experts and the people in control of your health and ask the hard inquiries. Dr. Taguchi is far more unique as an interview because of her cutting edge use of hormone in cancer patients after the standard of care treatment. Dr. Taguchi, welcome.

Dr. Taguchi:
Good morning T.S. thank you for having me on your program today.

T.S Wiley: 
It is an exceptional occasion to be receiving an oncologist here on the program that is far more than prepared to share her insights about the part of hormone replacement or significantly, the bio-identical hormone replacement therapy. Share with us your knowledge and growth with regards to your practice as an oncologist. 

Dr. Taguchi: 
And for those who aren't aware, T.S. Wiley and I met because of a patient. 

I had a patient called Dr. Anyway, he was an 89 year old man that had just moved from New Orleans to be with his two daughters; he was a doctor himself. He had every medical problem known to man. He was dealing with numbness of his legs and hands, his muscles became weak, his heart muscles too.
He was diagnosed with transitional cell cancer of the urethra or the tube that travels between the kidney and bladder. He had been treated two times before I met him and supposedly was in remission. But he wasn’t because he chest x-ray was full of tumor masses and his urine bloody with tumor cells.’

And during a fascinating association, he did receive progesterone, topically and orally. And to our surprise, this patient had a profound improvement. What was on his chest X-Ray when I first saw him was definitely thought metastatic cancer to the lung from the primary tumor of the bladder and the kidney and I believe it was six months, seven months, eight months later, it had disappeared. 

T. S. Wiley: 
When you got to experience the gradual changes did you ever query why oncologists were not introduced to endocrinology?

Dr. Taguchi:
No, I didn't visualize the impact. I mean it was a totally new area. Yes, once I discovered more about the situation, okay yes, bladder tissue, urethral tissue is actually very hormonally responsive. And progesterone (high doses) could have an impact. 

T. S. Wiley:
And during that time testosterone would have answered the usual treatment, am I correct? 

Dr. Taguchi:
I cannot really tell if during that time it would be the answer but it would have been the unconventional, but testosterone makes more sense than progesterone in a man.  Why should an ill person be granted testosterone?

T.S Wiley:
Right

Dr. Taguchi:
No, I definitely supported it because we didn't have anything else. I was going to give him chemotherapy and could make him worse. 

T.S. Wiley:

Isn’t that backwards?

Dr. Taguchi: 
Well, backwards in the sense yes, when they stop hormones or block hormones, the body has to respond to that particular event and the results we know, now that's coming out in the data, if you stop estrogen, and  testosterone and then there's more heart disease, a bony disease, and other serious health problems. And so, I believe people are trying to figure out another way to target the estrogen receptor for breast cancer and the androgen receptor for prostate cancer. 

T.S. Wiley:
The statement you make, do hormones create cancer, and it’s a good one because there are people who still believe that like estrogen causes breast cancer, testosterone causes prostate cancer. And it's so fascinating in the literature for men testosterone I think, has been redeemed as not causing prostate cancer. It is very evident. There's lot of support of evidence. 

I’ve written in my books, that hormones are the potential response to the development in cancer when they go down and that they reestablish to make something new. Taguchi has been with me for a long part of that journey and we're asking her inquiries about hormones and cancer, her education. Just how much research on cancer tests are you spearheading now at Sansum?

Dr. Taguchi:

I'm involved with about 20 various developments. I am not taking lead in any of them. I am the chief researcher and in charge for attempts that need to be completed, but am not responsible for a specific project, but I coordinate with section and helpful cluster.

T.S. Wiley: 
But you do not consider the rhythmic multi phasic of Biomimetic, bio-identical hormones similar to the Wiley Protocol as a cure.

Dr. Taguchi: 
I cannot guarantee a cure for any cancerous process. There is underlying genetics, epigenetics, and yes-the internal milieu of the body which includes hormones-optimal hormonal process preferred. Several women with a history of breast cancer have been on the WP and have not exploded with cancer as one may think. Most all of these women have remained in remission.

T.S. Wiley:
And that is when I began to do the development in an informal manner. I hope it was right. I have been definitely collecting the data and keeping track of these women very closely. Yes.

Dr. Taguchi: 
It would be a way that's really interesting that women who had breast cancer and hormone replacement do well and they look like they don't, you know get worse faster or have more regress or whatever after 5 years, I have five year data now. You have to go on and do another trial where you actually start from scratch. All will begin at the same time but in an unsystematic exam would be good. So, some women would receive hormone replacement, some would receive standard hormone replacement other than the rhythmic dosing and some would not receive any. 

Well, Isn't there already a lot of data out there that you have personally seen using synthetic hormones possibly Premarin, PremPro showing that women who do take these hormones after diagnosis, after standard care treatment, do, do better. I am considering a few.

There's one study from the WHI showing that using Premarin alone reduced the risk for breast cancer by 23% and the same study shows that giving daily oral Premarin plus Provera (Prempro) increased the risk of breast cancer by 0.4% per year.

T.S. Wiley:
Thanks.
Do you have a lot of trouble in your practice using bio-identical hormones? Was there any struggle of any form with other doctors? 

Dr. Taguchi: 
Yes, but less so now in 2012
But, of course you have to realize that a woman who is on hormone replacement is probably educated and know what they want and WHY. A lot of women with a history of breast cancer come to me asking for the hormones. But women ought to understand what benefit they may be forfeiting by not taking the anti hormones, like Arimidex or Tamoxifen to reduce a risk of a potential breast cancer relapse as well as the side effects of not having estrogen in the body.

T.S. Wiley:
Well, are there surveys out there on cancer patients who rejected any standard treatment – chemo and the anti-estrogens?

Dr. Taguchi: 
There are a good number of people who decline treatment or terminate it early, yes.

T. S. Wiley:
Okay, but are they also being supervised?

Dr. Taguchi:
I assume most are. Some may not even follow the standard of care at all and follow an alternative route instead.

T. S. Wiley: 
Is that documented?

Dr. Taguchi: 
Not now.

T. S. Wiley: 
It's true. Not now. I discovered they existed in the 1800s. But I cannot find them in the present time. Because of course, those people are provided treatment and you know they don't turn it down. They're scared for their lives. I found it fascinating to find the randomness of how many people lived with no treatment at all in an earlier era. That was very interesting.

Dr. Taguchi: 
T.S. you should know that there are people who turn down the standard of care. I know of some of them from other doctors.  There is this one physician I know that does not monitor his patients well, as per my standard of care. He does alternative treatments. But sometimes, when he feels that his patient would somehow respond to the standard treatment, he urges them to see me. You know but there's no record of those sorts of patients to compare with the standard of care practice and how they farer. There is no head to head comparison.

T. S. Wiley: 
I have studied some of your patients from the pieces that I do, and some of them consult with me then I advocate them to you. I presumed it was something else other than the cure since we do not use the term cure in cancer treatment. Now, we're obviously speaking about the hormone replacement therapy in the book we wrote together, the Wiley Protocol. You have got 91 patients on the Wiley Protocol particularly. 

Dr. Taguchi: 
True, more actually.

T. S. Wiley: 
You're observing fibroids. What else are you observing in those 91 patients?

Dr. Taguchi:
Enlargement of the uterus, occasionally NOT having a period, or having periods shorter than 28 days. Fibroids, breast and ovarian cysts, denser breasts. I see much better bone density.

T.S. Wiley: 
Well, let’s talk about that and talk about mammograms too.

T. S. Wiley: 
I have to ask this question Dr. Taguchi. You're an oncologist, do you get mammograms? 

Dr. Taguchi:
Yes, because there is a health recommendation to do it. But, I will admit I don't get them every year. 
Radiologists and epidemiologists, what we use in mammography is ionizing radiation to your breasts to find cancers early to reduce treatment and save lives – but it is the designing of treatment that has an impact. That’s why we do it. Yes there is data on mammogram induced breast cancers which is felt to be okay as they are small at diagnosis if one get an annual mammogram and the benefits of finding cancers is considered the better of the two. 

T. S. Wiley: 
In your opinion, does early knowledge of the cancer defers date of death? 

Dr. Taguchi: 
Well, as we are finding out, it is the biology of the cancer that matters. So a very aggressive small breast cancer can be deadly because it has the genetics to be deadly. Some very large breast cancers will not become metastatic because of the genetics or the inability to spread. So it’s possible or likely finding a cancer may not prevent death.

T.S. Wiley: 
Right. So can you really see the time of death through early catching?

Dr. Taguchi:
If you try to examine the facts being given now in American Cancer Society the answer to that is a yes. Not only from earlier detection. But, there's that effect but in addition to that, consensus says that the death rate from breast cancer is dropping.

T.S. Wiley: 
I call it massaging the data. 
There is an impact of data collection and you're right. But to add to that there have been statements made that refers to the decreasing of the death numbers. 

Dr. Taguchi: 
You know it's so interesting, we know that if you have a baby at around twenty or before the age of twenty, it's a good thing. If you have baby over the age of thirty, it's a raised risk of breast cancer and if you have your first born infant over the age of forty, it is the steepest risk for breast cancer.

T.S. Wiley: 
Fruitfulness is on a low level. I am positive you have your own thoughts too. Well this is it for us now. We are all so grateful Dr. Taguchi. It's been an eye opener and hopefully we can do another program with you, if you will come back.

Dr. Taguchi:
I certainly will. It's been a joy. Thank you so much for having me as an invitee.

 

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